Aunt Vel's Southern Fried Corn!


 
Fried corn is just about as southern as you can get and when the corn is fresh and it's done right it's delicious.  In the summer, we usually serve it with vine ripe sliced tomatoes and whatever other fresh vegetables we have at the time.   I think it's best when you use fresh cut right off the cob corn, but you can also use corn that you have put up or frozen (or canned) yourself.    We all cook corn this way, but the person in our family that is known for her fried corn is my Aunt Vel.  You know how some people just cook certain things better than other people and you can't figure out exactly why?  That is my Aunt Vel and her fried corn.  This is her recipe and it's the one we use, and even though it's really good, it never tastes as good as when Aunt Vel cooks it.  Anytime we have a dinner, we always ask her to bring her corn.  This isn't hard to do at all, but you do have to use what is called for and don't skimp on the ingredients or it won't be good.   Here is what you need:
 
6-8 ears of fresh corn (sweet corn is best)
1 Tbs. bacon drippings
2 Tbs. butter
1/2 cup milk
1 Tbs. cornstarch
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. black pepper
 
Shuck and silk your corn.  Make sure to remove all of the silks and then with a sharp knife cut the corn off into a bowl.  Once the kernels are all cut off, take your knife and scrape down the cob to remove any juice that is left in it.  This is what makes the corn creamy, so don't skip this step. 
 
In a skillet heat together the bacon drippings and the butter.  If you don't understand where you get the bacon drippings, because we haven't cooked any bacon, you might not be ready for this recipe...lol.   But if you are not a bacon grease collector, like most good southern cooks are, cook about 5 or six pieces of bacon and use the drippings for this corn.  Use the bacon for another recipe or eat it or save your bacon drippings from breakfast.  You cannot leave the bacon drippings out of this though.  It just won't be fried corn if you do.
 
 

Add the corn and let it cook on medium heat for about 15 minutes.   Mix the cornstarch and the 1/2 cup cold milk until smooth.  Pour that mixture into the corn and bring it up to a bubble.  Stir and cook just until it thickens.   Add the salt and pepper and stir again and serve.
 
 
 
 





153 comments:

  1. What kind of beans are those on the plate they look like speckled butter beans cooked with smoked meat of some sort.

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    1. They are speckled butter beans.

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    2. They look like pintos to me.

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    3. I LOVE FRIED CORN ALSO, WE WERE RAISED ON THAT ALONG WITH THE VEGETABLES, I DIDN'T ADD ANYTHING BUT REAL BUTTER SALT AND PEPPER. I ALSO HAVE FIXED IT LIKE THIS PLUS ADDING PARMACIAN CHEESE AND MAYONAISE WITH CAYENNE PEPPER. THIS MAKES IT MEXICAN STYLE AND BOY IS IT DELICIOUS

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    4. AND DON'T FORGET THE CAST IRON FRY PAN TOO.

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    5. I live in georgia and we loved fried corn, greens, biscuits...the real cat head kind and fried green tomatoes. there are so many wonderful southern things here in georgia that you dont find any where else. We are the true south!!!! And let us not forget the wilted lettuce

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  2. This is the way I cook my corn. The same way my Mother cooked it. Nothing any better unless it is leaf lettuce with bacon grease with a little sugar and vinegar. Yes I collect and save bacon grease to.

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    1. Absolutely!

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    2. I keep bacon grease like a religion.... lol ..I put it in Mac and cheese..I do that to keep the pasta from clumping... "that's if your using the box mac and cheese"... I use it regardless.. I also like olive oil... really good..

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    3. What is that recipe with lettuce, bacon grease and sug and vin ? ? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ up there. ^^^^^^^^

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    4. I would really love the wilted lettuce recipe, my grandma used to make it, with the bacon grease and sugar and vinegar, I just don't know the amounts.

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    5. I sometime put a drizzle of bacon drippings in my deviled eggs.

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    6. not sure how your granny made it Tina but round our place the amounts were "til it looks right" LOL my momma always makes killer wilted lettuce and her fried corn is the bomb...got me wanting both now :)

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    7. Best part of summer, wilted lettuce and fried green tomatoes.

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    8. Just dissolve sugar in the vinegar until you get a sweet tartness you like add it in the bacon grease then heat it up when it is very hot pour it over your bowl of clean leaf lettuce and toss. Requires a lot of lettuce to make for dinner because it wilts down so much. I like green onions in my lettuce if you like them wilt with the lettuce and you can put some bacon crumbles on it too. You will have to play around with the measurements depending on the amount of lettuce you use. I usually use my one cup glass measuring cup to mix my vinegar and sure so it isn't completely full or you wouldn't be able to stir and I would say it's probably about 1/4 cup bacon grease in the skillet. Just play with it and once you get it the way you like it use the same bowl and cups to do your mixing in-best wishes:)

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    9. I have made a wilted salad with mustard greens or spinach. Add boiled eggs. Yummy

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    10. I use al sorts of green ,young,cut real fine added to lettuce very good

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    11. We always made wilted salad by using leaf lettuce, cut up green onions then heat up bacon grease, about a tablespoon or so of sugar and about 1/8 cup of vinegar--heat it up and pour over the lettuce and green onions. Toss and eat--can also add crumbled up bacon

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    12. I make wilted salad, in bowls for how many are eating, I tear up lettuce, dice tomatoes, and chopped green onions, I fry several pieces of bacon, if there isn't alot of grease I add alittle canola oil I heat it till hot and pour on salads crumble bacon on top and sprinkle salt and pepper. Thats the way my mom made it. Make sure to serve right away. A friend of mine would fry the bacon and add some Italian salad dressing to the grease get it really hot and pour it over the salad, I don't post very often as you can tell.....sorry !

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    13. I tried to explain wilted lettuce to my daughter in law yesterday. She had no idea what I was talking about. Happens if you are born in the north

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  3. This is how I do corn. Great recipe!

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  4. IF YOU DON'T HAVE CORNSTARCH YOU CAN USE FLOUR IT WORKS AND TASTES GREAT!

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    1. Thanks! I was JUST wondering that. :)

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    2. I always have used flour because that's how my mom always did it!! Love fried corn!!

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    3. My Mother did this using early field corn...Delicous!!!!!!

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  5. I'm from Virginia and as country as you can get and I have never heard of fried corn! I will give this a try, but to be honest, I love corn on the cob, I don't see how you can get any better than that!

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    1. Rhonda, try fried corn, you will be hooked with the first bite...

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    2. If you've never heard of fried corn, your country learning has a huge hole in it somewhere along the line!!!!! LOL Fried corn is a staple on every table in western North Carolina along with biscuits - either as breakfast, dinner or supper!!!! Try it - it's absolutely delicious!

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    3. You will love fried corn and what we call "wilted lettuce" nothing can be better !!!

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    4. I grew up on the coast of Alabama and Miss., that's about as south as you can get. My whole family is country. I had never heard of fried corn until I visited Kentucky when I was in high school. I don't think my "country learning" has any holes in it. There's just certain areas of the south that have regional dishes. I also had never had fried green tomatoes on the coast either, though my Aunt fixed them all the time. She lived "up north" in Birmingham.

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    5. Rhonda, if you love corn on the cob you should try it in the microwave. Take an ear of corn with the husks & silks still on.
      Cut off the bottom of the corn maybe the lenght of your pinkie
      finger, if that's too much you can cut less next time. Lay the corn
      in the microwave on 3 minutes. Remove with a hot pad. Hold the corn by the top of the corn silks & shake it up & down. The corn should drop out of the husks & there won't be a silk on it.
      You make have to shake it hard ~up & down 3 or 4 times. I don't even put butter or salt on mine any more~ it's sooo good. You can microwave more than 1 at a time just add extra 3 min for each ear.

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    6. Rhonda

      My mother uses corn on the cob when making fried corn. She uses the small ears and rolls them in seasoned cornmeal and places in hot grease/oil. She serves it with fried fish.

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    7. you are kidding me i am from kentucky andi have heard of fried corn all my life and also in virginia where my husbands from too i have heard of it ! it is devine!!!!!

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    8. I am from Ky too. Fried corn, fresh green beans, tomatoes and corn bread! What a meal in the summer. Now my sister in law freezes the corn and cans green beans and I still get my favorite summer meal when I visit.

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    9. Sorry Rhonda,and Donna, I am from Mississippi, and have eaten fried corn for over 70 years, so has my husband from Louisiana; so not sure about your Southern heritage. You obviously are not African American!!! Oh, and the recipe is pretty much the same, except we fry thick-sliced bacon, or sliced salt pork until crisp, remove meat,pour off the fat, leaving meat droppings in skillet, add corn and other ingredients listed, plus BUTTER; dice the meat,and place on top of corn before serving- thats Mississippi style!!

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  6. I have loved this kind of corn forever....now 69. I use water and no milk. I also cut out bacon drippings and use butter and water, salt and pepper. My children love it and so do I. I can make it with yellow or white corn. My mother and grandmother always used white corn or silver queen.

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    1. ''' I follow ur recipe exactly { maybe add a small pinch of cayenne pep. }......... U gooo girl !!!!!!!!!!!! ENJOY !!!!!!1

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    2. I love Silver Queen Corn... not quite as sweet as the bi-color corn.. Makes the best fried corn ever !!

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  7. Does the liquid scraped off the cobs go into the pan when the corn goes in, or when the milk mixture goes in? This sounds really good and I want to do it right!

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    1. You scrape that down into the corn. It is what makes it creamy. We just cut the corn off, leaving a bit of the kernel on the cob the first cut and the scrape the last of it off.

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    2. When one scrapes the cob we call it milking the cob!

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    3. My mother and grandma used to make it and now so do I. It is absolutely delicious.

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  8. My Daddy made THE BEST fried corn ever. He only used Hickory Cane white corn, which isn't as sweet as Silver Queen. Butter, bacon drippings, and pepper were all he used...no milk or cornstarch. I'd give my eyeteeth to have some of his fried corn. I can't get Hickory Cane in Alabama. He bought his from a couple of local Bowling Green, KY farmers, but I haven't been able to find them when I go home to visit

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    1. My mother loves the Hickory Cane corn also. You can still get it here if you get out there early to find it. It goes fast as does the Silver Queen which is my husband's favorite.

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    2. My granny kept her bacon grease in a tin can on stove now days theres all plastic where can I find a tin can like old days

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    3. I have seen cans for that at WalMart and other stores. Look in the aisle where the kitchen stuff is, like canisters and such.

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    4. I keep bacon greese in a metal percolator coffee pot. Got it in the camping isle at walmart. I pour it in thru the grounds basket and that filters out any scrapins left in the skillet

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    5. I like my momma use a Mason jar. Our Bacon greese don't last long.

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    6. Anonymous- If you can get hold of a Walter Drake catalog, you can order a small metal pitcher for bacon grease. It has a strainer in it to sift out large pieces of bacon. I think I gave about six dollars for mine.And it has a lid.

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  9. I thank you, thank you for this recipe. My grandmother made fried corn and I just loved it. It has been many years since I had hers and I have tried to make it but failed. I thought she put cream in it so now I know. I will be making this tonight.

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  10. R U sure this is NOT my sis posting this recipe...I tho't it was a 'secret' family recipe of 'our's' :+)...Have made it for over 50 yrs...and my Mom/Grandmom before me....

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  11. Sounds like my mom's fried corn. Love this stuff!

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  12. I use heavy cream instead of milk but there is nothing like Fried Corn. I like to fix a mess of green beans or peas or lima beans fresh and then whatever is left over, I mix together (corn & beans) for the next day (succotash).

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  13. Try it with chopped green chilis!!

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  14. Love this recipe! About 15 years ago we were at a MX race with our son. I forgot the box with all my dry ingredients. I melted butter in the cast iron skillet, and just cooked the corn cobs in it. Let it get a little hot so some places on the corn began to brown. It is now my families favorite way to eat corn.

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    1. like an "almost" deep-fried corn on the cobb!!! oh my! gonna give yours a try also!

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  15. How much corn do you use if It's frozen bagged corn?

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  16. I cook my corn in the iron frying pan but in the oven and not on top of the stove.

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  17. I miss my mothers fried corn!

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  18. I no longer buy corn by the bushel, shuck, cut and freeze since the kids are grown with families of their own. I prefer plain old white field corn for fried corn and Silver Queen for corn-on-cobb. Cook the same way except never had to add cornstarch or flour to thicken. The corn "milk" always thicken for me. Never put any sugar in my corn either. I am 72 years old. Use to put 3 or 4 bushels of cut corn in the freezer every year along with peas, butterbeans, squash, and okra. BJ Wells

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    1. Miz BJ; you sound like you raised yours...like my mama raised us. Bless your heart <3

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  19. Rhonda, it seems to be a Tennessee "thang." I moved to Texas & no one had ever heard of it. Everyone I knew cooked it this way at home in West Tennessee for generations. We thought everyone ate it & I was shocked to find out that no one knew about this. Everyone in Texas who eats it at my home comes back for more--they just didn't know what they were missing, poor things!!! Once you eat this, you will only eat corn on the cob occasionally for picnics or when you just don't have time to cut it off :) Honestly, when it is cut off & frozen correctly, it is practically as good as fresh & you can enjoy it all year! Sorry, but I just use real butter & salt to season mine with. Also, has to be cooked in a black skillet or it is not the same!!!

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    1. I'm a Texan and I've had fried corn all my 65 years. Those Texans you encountered sure have missed the boat. My husband's mother has cooked it and said she learned from her mother and they are all born Texan.

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    2. in a pinch take two cans of whole kernel corn to make it.

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    3. I was worried no one would mention the cast Iron skillet! LOL Learned my corn cooking from Fayetteville, Tn and W. Ky real close to W. Tn. Never thought about it being regional.

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    4. I was born and raised in Texas. My paternal grandmother made corn like this. She didn't
      call it fried corn, it was skillet corn. Next to ambrosia to me, I always loved that corn. My maternal grandmother made many wonderful dishes but she did not make skillet corn and so my mother didn't either. It was a real treat to see this recipe posted today, thank you!

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    5. It's a Kentucky "thang" too. I like a sprinkle (probably a teaspoon) of sugar mixed in mine while frying. No milk, no cornstarch. I hate to admit that I've been caught without bacon drippings since we try to eat healthier. If I don't have any bacon I just sub. butter. Not exactly the same, but it still eats good.

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    6. My mother made it like this, but could use canned corn in winter too. She & her sister grew up in W. TN, E. AR & in Memphis.... I can taste it now. Wish I had some of her bacon grease.

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    7. nope, definately NOT a Tennessee thing. I was born, raised and still reside in south Alabama and fried corn is a STAPLE!

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    8. I am from Texas and have had fried corn all my 57 years!!!!! Now if you talking CITY folks from Texas they might not have ever heard of fried corn...but country folks sure know what fried corn..skillet corn..corn off the cob...is all about. For the new converters!!! Be careful when you cut the kernels of the cob...Just cut the outer edge..yes you will leave some but that is what you collect when you gently scrap the cob down. This is a family favorite!!!

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  20. You cannot get any better than this and Silver Queen is hard to beat. This is what I had for lunch today.

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  21. Any idea where I can purchase an old fashioned bacon dripping can? Preferably with a strainer on it and lid???? My brother threw ours away while I was in the hospital??? Help.

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    1. Try estate sales or garage sales. Only older people used these. If you went to the store to buy one, they wouldn't know what you're talking about. Most estate sales are from older people that have passed away and family is getting rid of their stuff.

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    2. If you can't find one you can get a little metal coffee
      pot like used for camping that's what I use.

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    3. Yep, Wal Mart

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    4. Try Fred's store

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    5. I ordered a small tin can with strainer from "walter drake" catalog! bacon grease only goes in it!

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    6. You can go into the Vermont Country Store on line catalog. I think I have seen them there.

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    7. I ordered one from either Walter Drake or Carol Wright!!!

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    8. Walter Drake has them....it is called "oil strainer" 9.99 a








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    9. I keep a tupperware type container in my freezer and freeze my bacon grease. It is great and out of the way. Was raised in Indiana, love fried corn.

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  22. If you go to the frozen corn on the cob section in the store.there is rolls of frozen cream corn..taste just like fried corn..its awesome!! Were addicted

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    1. I found the rolled corn in the freezer, & agree that is the best for fried corn. You have to have the corn cream to make it good. the whole kernel just doesnt do it. I use bacon grease to fry in (only way to do it right). I have chopped onions for anyone who wants to put onions on it. My grandma when she made it swore you had to cut the corn 3 times, just barley the tops,the kernel, then the scrape all she did was fry it with salt & pepper. It was to die for. I would add the onions and "real" butter (more salt for me), and eat away. Tasting it right now.

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    2. You can also find rolls of McKenzie's Fried Corn in the freezer section. Not bad, not bad at all. Of course, fresh, home-made is better!

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    3. that is the way my grandmother did it also....she had a sharp little knife

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    4. I have always cut it 3 times,,if you just cut the whole kernel off and scrape it ,it just whole kernel corn...

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    5. Three times thats how my Granny taught me!

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  23. Well I'll be...never heard of fried corn, or the names of corn before. Is this corn grown specifically in your region...because here in CA there is yellow corn and white corn...no names.

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    1. Silver Queen is a type of white corn that is very popular in the southern usa. But, any corn can be used to make fried corn. In Georgia, where I grew up, we did not call it fried corn, even though it was made the same way. We called it creamed corn. Did not have any milk in it, only 3 times cut
      corn, bacon drippings, salt & pepper.

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    2. We called it creamed corn.....still love it! Any corn will do...Silver Queen is the best..but you can use any!

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  24. My Aunt Vel makes the best Friend Corn in our family also. Must be something in the name! This is he receipe and its just not the same when I make it.

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    1. Isn't that funny. Everybody needs an Aunt Vel.

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  25. When I was growing up we had fried corn with the speckled or green butter beans along with fresh tomatoes, fresh green onions, cornbread and sweet tea...yum yum.Thanks for this wonderful reminder and recipe!

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    1. June we did too growing up n before my husband died we had it all in the summer as the gardens came in..good eating...

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  26. Thank you so much for posting this recipe! My Nanny made the best fried corn I have ever eaten and I have tried to make it and failed every time. I should have paid attention when she was cooking it! Happiness!

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  27. My Mom was from Florida and this is my favorite thing to eat every Summer when we went to see my Grandma and Grandpa and we picked the corn and got it ready for my Grandma and Aunts to cook. OH my the memories of the food out of that garden. They have also used a grater to get the corn off and it makes it kind of like mush but it is the best.

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  28. The old field corn is what I prefer. It self thickens from the excess cornstarch. Farmers don't grow it often because you have to pick it as soon as it ripens for it to be tender. Mostly grown as cattle feed.

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  29. Isn't this also called creamed corn? I'm in Georgia and we've done this but never called it fried corn.

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    1. I am from ga, also and yes they do sound similar and probably are the same. but you can make creamed corn a little soupy. fresh corn off the cobb most always was/and is cooked in a iron skeelitt, well anything cooked in a skelitt is considered 'fried' the milkcorn juce or any liquid used and regards to the amount used is why some call it 'creamed'

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  30. I am the worlds pickiest eater and as a child, this was the one thing I loved more than ice cream. It was the only vegetable I would eat so my mom would make it and freeze it for when corn was not in season. Now at 57 yrs. old I miss my mom and her corn something terrible. We never called it fried corn, we just called it cream corn. I remember watching her make it so with the help of this recipe, I think I now have the courage to try to make it myself!
    Thank You!
    GRD

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    1. its called fried corn because you cook it in an iron skillet

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  31. You got that! Bacon drippings make all the difference in lots of receipes! Thanks for sharing all your wonderful receipes too....I can't wait to try more of them. :)

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  32. I like to use White Silver Queen corn (it is sweet). So much better than yellow corn. Try to use only bacon grease and butter with black pepper and water and cook until water reduces. YUM!!!!!

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  33. This is how I do my fried corn except my Grandma taught me to cut just the tips off first round of the cob, then cut to the cob then "milk" the cob by scraping it. When I make this I have to plan on at least 2 ears per person. My family LOVES it.

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  34. LOOK,I am sure each of you love your version of fried corn, BUT if you leave out the BACON GREASE( call it what it is, changing the name to drippings does not lower the fat content!) it is not the way fried corn is supposed to be cooked! besides it should be a crime, to leave bacon grease out of anything!

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  35. Ok after reading all of this I know what I'm having for dinner tomorrow. Fried corn wilted lettuce. Fresh tomatoes and cornbread. Love them all and haven't cooked in hits some time.

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    1. This was my favorite meal - except we also have fried okra with it. I'd love to be sitting around my grandmother's table again, eating this.

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  36. I'm from Louisiana and fried corn is the best corn ever. My grandparents made it a lot and I tried to eat it all. The one's asking about the wilted salad, I never used anything but bacon grease for the dressing. Yes, very fattening which is why we don't eat it often, but I put lettuce (can't remember the exact kind of lettuce I use) green onions, radishes, bacon and eggs, then poor hot bacon grease over it. Delish.

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  37. My Grandma Freeman was well known for her fried corn. I don't think she used milk & cornstarch though; butter, bacon grease, salt & pepper. I guess if the corn was a little dry (depending on when it was picked - always used yellow field corn)she might have added a little milk to that cast iron skillet. Sure miss her and her cooking!

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  38. My son's favorite food of all time. We just called this "creamed corn" made with the freshest corn available, cut just the tops off the kernels, scrape the rest off the cob, throw it in the old iron frying pan with some good butter, salt, pepper, heat til thickens (stirring often cause it sticks). And may have to add a little water or cream if gets too thick. Never used bacon drippings but will try it next time.

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  39. This is an excellent recipe, but I dont use the cornstarch...The real HINT to this recipe is the way you cut the corn from the cob,,, use a sharp knife, and cut the corn above the base at the cob,leaving a bit of the kernal. Use the edge of your knife then to scrape down the cop, taking the juices and bits of the kernel off the cob.I also use an iron skillet,,,,

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  40. when you buy the seed it is called hickory king. we raise it in our garden, it is just mispronounced Hickory cane you know how we southerners have our own language

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  41. I think some of these folks are confused. I bet they have eaten creamed corn. I grew up knowing it as fried corn.
    I prefer white field corn either Trucker's Favorite or Hickory Cane for fried corn. I also make two cuts on the niblets before I scrape the cob. Barely take off the top of the nub on first cut then once again, then scrape the milk into the bowl with the niblets. And YES, I am a bacon, streak o lean grease saver as well. Can't cook Southern without it.

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  42. Ahhhmemories!! My daddy used to fix fried corn for me when I was growing up . It was just a special treat. He would often scramble and egg and add to it! LOVE IT. That is my comfort food. When having a bad day, fried corn and eggs. Sometimes he would add a dribble of honey to it. :)

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  43. so funny yes mississippi had fried corn lots of it

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  44. Yes us southerners have our own language. So glad to live in south and in USA...

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  45. Raised in Alabama and love this recipe. My grandmother cooked it in the iron skillet but we called it creamed corn. The bacon drippings made it special. My "rich" friend from across town never had it at her house so she ate at mine. We poor folks had the best food right out of the garden. lol

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  46. The Lettuce we use is Curly Leaf Lettuce and you pick only the outer leafs and let the stalk continue to grow so you can continue to pick leafs to cook. They are tender even though they are outside leafs.

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  47. For those who use bacon drippings there is a product on the market now called GRANNIES OLD FASHION BACON DRIPPINGS and it is wonderful and there are so many possibilities to using it. Their office is Twin Foods, Inc. Broken Arrow, Ok 74012. I use it and don't have to keep bacon fried to use it.

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  48. Fried corn is the best summer time side dish. Cut and then scraped off the gobb make your tongue slap you in the mouth so good. got to have bacon grese and butter, salt & pepper so many people never heard of it but when I was a child my dad would buy and my other mother would fry it we children would eat it until we almost bust open. Fried chicken yeast rolls sweet potatoes candied, pole beans or speckaled butter beans lady peas, turnip and mustard greens hot cornbread Ice tea sunday dinner was like that followed by a nice nap. Thanks for sharing the recipe and bringing back the memories that make me smie. I makde this for chidldren and now making for Grandchildren who love it and request it be part of Sunday dinner. I live in Chicago area but I am a very southern woman at heart when it comes to cooking and manners. Rita Robinson

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  49. In Northwest Florida we call it Creamed Corn! Best from an iron skillet. We do not use bacon grease anymore since today it is full of nitrates and chemicals. We use all butter

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  50. Fried corn, fried cabbage, fresh from the garden sliced tomatoes and cucumbers, a piece of ham and I am in hog heaven. I may dislike the heat but I love summer suppers!

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    1. when I was growing up my grandmaw made, fried corn ,fried cabbage tom and picked cucumbers for our suppers could not get enough and a lot of times we had fried corn bread to.

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  51. walmart and u can get them out of the Harriet Carter books...I use a ceramic crock for mine

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  52. I like to take my hands and squeeze the corn for more of the liquid. It makes for thicker corn and you don't have to add the corn starch...Just add water and let it cook down.

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  53. I use fried fatback or streaked meat if i have it you might have to adjust salt if it is salt cured meat and use a little flour instead of cornstarch. I am Pure Southern from South Carolina

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  54. I always served fresh fried cream corn,fried okra,speckled or green butter beans,fresh ripe tomatoes ,cornbread,sweet tea and homemade peach ice cream during some of our Sunday dinners.

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  55. Just cut my corn off the cob and getting ready to cook this tonight-can't wait. I love your comment about the bacon drippings-too funny!

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  56. I am from Texas and I love fried corn. I use a quart mason jar for my bacon grease and keep it in the fridge.

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  57. Another way to change this recipe is cut up onions,and dice fresh tomatoes and add after frying the cut off corn in bacon grease. Cook till the tomato is just streaks of red stir often so it won't burn ,no milk or cream ,salt and pepper as desired .It's a totally different taste,but so so good.

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  58. RE: Bacon Drippings. If you want a "metal" can w/lid to keep your drippings in, the easiest is to use a empty coffee can. Keep in mind, metal is porous, and the grease will seep through, Thus you may designate a certain Saucer to always keep under your can. This prevents the grease ring on your countertop. Or, Use glass. Any old pickle jar will do, just let your grease cool a bit, before pouring into jar. When you purchase a can w/strainer for drippings,...Usually the strainer holes are to big, or they clog up the first time you use it. better to use a piece of scrap cloth, like a cutting from a clean old T-shirt. Find a can just small enough to fit inside the other one, cut both ends out, put fabric over one end, wrap several times with cotton string, and tie tightly. make sure all edge of material go down into your larger can.

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  59. That's pretty much the way my mama taught me to fix it (here in southeast Texas), but mine is never as good as hers was. Prefer the flavor of the old fashioned field corn or "roasting ears", but haven't had much luck finding anything but sweet corn. Can taste it now, along with sliced fresh tomatoes, fried okra, and purple hull peas and sweet iced tea!

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  60. I love fried Corn.Have not had any in a while,but will soon!

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  61. Well, I'm PA born and bred and I grew up with a lot of recipes that you people consider southern. Like: fried green tomatoes (love em)milk gravy, we made that with fried ham, creamed dried beef over toast or homefries instead of sausage gravy. By the way, that is about the only way I like fresh sausage and of course cornbread. When we make fried green tomatoes we also make gravy out of red tomatoes, fried and then smashed down with milk of light cream added. put that with some boiled potatoes and the fried green tomatoes and thats all you need for supper.Now when I say PA I'm talking about N, Central PA, up in the mountains. Could the similarities be more Po Folk food rather than just southern?

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  62. I have spent a lot of time in the south and I have never heard of fried corn, but the recipe looks so yummy. I have guests coming for dinner next week and am always looking for something new to try, I am definitely going to make this!

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  63. With whole kernel frozen corn, take half of it aand blend it with a little milk mix it together and cook. Just like cream corn.

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  64. I am from Texas..... 40 yrs there and have never heard of Fried corn. This recipe reminds me of Creamed corn.....sounds good tho and will be trying it soon.

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  65. Teresa from IndianaAugust 21, 2013 at 6:18 PM

    my grandma cuts it off like you say to, but we cook it in a glass bowl in the microwave with butter, sugar, salt and pepper. Tastes just like it came off the cob, but without the mess of the cob. YUM!!!!

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  66. My mother always made the best fried corn. The leftovers were put in the fridge and the next day we would have cold corn sandwichs with a slice of juicy tomato on white bread....oh my mouth is watering!!

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  67. well well well, i read all these comments and all i can say is, wow!!! I have made "fried corn" every Thanksgiving and Christmas for over 20 yrs now. I put mine up (freeze) it in the summer and its awesome for the holidays!! And yes, I have a cast iron skillet and bacon drippings in a coffee cup. I have never used milk or cornstarch but to each their own. Born and raised in Tennessee!!!

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  68. Could you please share your recipe for Tuna Casserole? I love tuna, but the only way I have had this is the Tuna Helper box from the store. It was OK, but need something GOOD from scratch. Thank You

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  69. I was raised on food like this up here in north-central Missouri. Lots of corn around here. Corn and cows :)
    I notice some call this fried corn and some cream corn. We distinguish between the two. Like fried corn the best, yum. It's funny to me how the food southern people talk about is the same as we have. Only we call it heartland or midwest food. And there's no tea but sweet tea! If you ask for a glass of tea, it's sweet unless you specify otherwise.

    Vicky in north Missouri

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  70. I have to say that I am the ghetto momma on the block. I use 2 can regular corn totally drained. I cook 4 slices bacon and save the drippings. I pull the bacon and add 2 tbsp butter and then add the drained corn. I let is cook and color some. Then I add 1.5 tbsp flour, to a small can of condensed milk and whisk. I pour that into the skillet and add fresh ground pepper, no salt coz there is some in the corn already, and a little cayenne for some hot. Occasionally I add some chopped yellow onions during the cooking process but not often.. It might not sound as good but trust me....

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  71. My Mom made this all the time as well as the wilted lettuce. But our "wilted lettuce" was bacon drippings poured over the lettuce and fresh green onions. Then added bacon and salt. NO sugar or vinegar. But it was awesome. So many memories of all the fresh vegetables from the garden. Good old Georgia cooking.

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  72. We grew up eating fried field corn. Just cut the corn from the cob. Fry in bacon grease and add salt and pepper. Now I substitute butter and olive oil. Not as good but not bad. My husband who grew up about ten miles from me never had fried corn. Now he loves it. Eastern Kentucky native.

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  73. Made this tonight with Meatloaf and Mashed Taters and it was so GOOD! Wish I had some fresh green beans and a big ol sliced tomato to go with it.

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  74. My Oklahoma Mother made the lettuce, bacon grease, vinegar, a little sugar and salt. We called it wilted lettuce salad and it was delicious. The lettuce was sliced thin. Then she heated the other ingredients, poured it over the lettuce and set a plate on top so the lettuce would wilt down. Then she sprinkled the bacon bits over the top. Yum.

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  75. Since it's close to Winter now and I do not can vegetables, can you use can or frozen corn? Also which is better white or yellow?

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    1. In the freezer section they sell creamed corn frozen in a roll. PicSweet makes one and there is a brand called Mackenzies. You can use that and it's really good. White or yellow or mixed is fine.

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